COOL TIME-LAPSE VIDEO – THE GERALD DESMOND BRIDGE PROJECT > THE I-710 CONNECTION ROAD DEMOLITION

September 26, 2014 on 8:34 am | In Curious, Green Building, Green Workplace, Greenhouse Gas, Snapshot, Solutions, Uncategorized, Water | No Comments

from Jodi Summers

The Gerald Desmond Bridge in Long Beach is a through arch bridge that carries four lanes from the end of Interstate 710 across the Cerritos Channel to Terminal Island. The bridge is named after Gerald Desmond, a civic leader and former city attorney for the City of Long Beach.

Built in the 1960s (with Bethlehem Steel), the Gerald Desmond Bridge was not designed to handle today’s supertankers and traffic volumes and it has been deteriorating, so it is being replaced.

The new bridge, due for completion in 2016, will allow access to the port for even the tallest container ships. It will be the first long-span cable-stayed bridge in California. (A cable-stayed bridge has one or more towers (or pylons), from which cables support the bridge deck.)

Time-lapse video featuring new footage of the SB I-710 Freeway connector demolition work that took place from May 23 – June 22, 2014. The connector to WB Ocean Blvd. was demolished to make room for the new bridge foundations.

In order for the bridge to be so tall, long approaches will be required to allow heavy trucks to cross the structure. A joint venture of Parsons Transportation Group and HNTB performed preliminary engineering for the main span and the approaches.

The current bridge proved to be obsolete in March 2012, when the 155-foot (47 m) vertical clearance of the bridge was not enough to allow the Fabiola to enter the Port of Long Beach. At 12,562 TEUs, the Fabiola was, to date, the largest container ship to date to enter the Port of Long Beach. The height restriction prevented the ship from docking at the Mediterranean Shipping Company dock; it docked at the Hanjin terminal instead.

The Gerald Desmond Bridge will continue to be a vital link in the nation’s trade system and a major commuter corridor.

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https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3AWP2sDkpusdN_g8iUnKVA

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerald_Desmond_Bridge

http://www.polb.com/about/projects/gdb.asp

http://www.socalindustrialrealestateblog.com/?p=2298

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http://wp.me/p4mKEJ-23

POLB IS NAMED THE BEST GREEN SEAPORT

July 4, 2014 on 7:46 am | In Act Locally, Global Statistics, Green Workplace, Greenhouse Gas, Snapshot, Solutions, Uncategorized, Water | 2 Comments

by Jodi Summers

Bravo! The Port of Long Beach has been recognized as the “Best Green Seaport” in the world at the 28th annual Asian Freight & Supply Chain Awards.

The Port of Long Beach is one of the world’s premier seaports, a primary gateway for trans-Pacific trade and a trailblazer in innovative goods movement, safety and environmental stewardship. The Port is served by 140 shipping lines with connections to 217 seaports worldwide. A major economic engine for the region, the Port handles trade valued at more than $180 billion each year and supports hundreds of thousands of Southern California jobs.

In 2005, the Port of Long adopted a “Green Port Policy,” focusing reducing its impact on the community, wildlife and the environment…with unmitigated success. The POLB is proud of the dramatic improvement in air and water quality thanks to an array of environmental initiatives that include the Clean Trucks, Green Flag Vessel Speed Reduction and Technology Advancement programs.

“This is an honor to be named the AFSCA’s Best Green Seaport. The Port of Long Beach has made great strides in reducing air pollution and improving water quality, and we are committed to doing even more,” said Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners President Doug Drummond.

The Port’s growth policy has had tremendous results. The total number of containers handled at the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles in May increased by 5.6% on a year-over-year basis to 1,288,652 TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent units). This was the 14th consecutive month of at least 1 million TEUs for the San Pedro Bay ports.

The Port of Long Beach’s Green Port Policy is an aggressive, comprehensive and coordinated approach to reduce the negative impacts of Port operations. The Green Port Policy, adopted in 2005, serves as a guide for decision making and established a framework for environmentally friendly Port operations. The policy’s five guiding principles are:

  • Protect the community from harmful environmental impacts of Port operations.
  • Distinguish the Port as a leader in environmental stewardship and compliance.
  • Promote sustainability.
  • Employ best available technology to avoid or reduce environmental impacts.
  • Engage and educate the community.

The Green Port Policy includes six basic program elements, each with an overall goal:

  1. Wildlife – Protect, maintain or restore aquatic ecosystems and marine habitats.
  2. Air – Reduce harmful air emissions from Port activities.
  3. Water – Improve the quality of Long Beach Harbor waters.
  4. Soils/Sediments – Remove, treat, or render suitable for beneficial reuse contaminated soils and sediments in the Harbor District.
  5. Community Engagement – Interact with and educate the community regarding Port operations and environmental programs.
  6. Sustainability – Implement sustainable practices in design and construction, operations, and administrative practices throughout the Port.

The “Green Seaport” honor of the Asian Freight & Supply Chain Awards is reserved for ports that have “demonstrated compliance with green freight transport regulations and environmental standards; investment in green initiatives, technology and action plans; incorporation of environmental requirements in strategic planning; use of a policy on reducing fuel emissions from freight handling operations; and ongoing training of staff in green initiatives and in measures to lower carbon footprints.”

The awards are based on an annual poll of thousands of professionals in freight transportation services. Awards also are given in many categories, including best shipping lines, container terminals, air cargo terminals, airports and rail haulers.

Find out more about the Port of Long Beach’s environmental programs at www.polb.com/environment.

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http://www.polb.com/environment/green_port_policy/default.asp

http://www.socalgreenrealestateblog.com/?p=3430

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http://www.socalindustrialrealestateblog.com/?p=2219

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http://cdn.everythinglongbeach.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/long-beach-port.jpg

 

LIVE WHERE YOU WORK? THE ADAPTIVE REUSE OF OFFICE BUILDINGS

April 2, 2014 on 7:57 am | In Green Building, Green Cities, Recycling, Snapshot, Solutions, Trends, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

by Jodi Summers

You know the story, the greenest building is the one already built. So you must be a big fan of  those fabulous loft conversions in downtown Los Angeles – old office buildings and factories that have been renovated into apartments and condos. That’s what’s happening with a lot of that extra office space…that’s in cool buildings.

In 2012, nationwide, office stock shrunk in a third of the 54 top U.S. markets. Buildings worth saving are being converted, while lesser buildings are being demolished. The result is that the net inventory has dropped by about 21.6 million square feet > or 0.3% of inventory. In Los Angeles, available office space has declined by -16.2% according to Loopnet.

Over the next four quarters, approximately 11 of the top 54 U.S. metros and almost half of the 1,400 submarkets in those metros will have a net loss of inventory.

Conversion to residential usage is the most prominent reason that an office building is removed from inventory. Condo and apartment conversions comprise 34% of the lost office space, according to CoStar. Additionally another 13% of office space has been demolished to make way for new residential construction.

In high density urban areas where housing is needed, multifamily repositionings benefit both owner and user. The ideal conversion candidate – transit-accessible office structures built circa 1930 with 22,000-square-foot floor plates.

For more information please contact Jodi Summers and the SoCal Investment Real Estate Group @ Sotheby’s International Realty – jodi@jodisummers.com or 310.392.1211, and let us move forward together.

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http://www.costar.com/News/Article/Didnt-That-Used-to-Be-an-Office-Building-/153464?ref=/News/Article/Didnt-That-Used-to-Be-an-Office-Building-/153464&src=rss

http://www.marcusmillichap.com/Services/Research/Default.aspx#2

http://www.socalgreenrealestateblog.com/?p=2983

http://www.loopnet.com/Los-Angeles_California_Market-Trends?Trends=TotalSFAvailableFS&PropertyTypes=Office

http://www.socalmultiunitrealestateblog.com/?p=2563

http://www.thekorgroup.com/images/900×430/xo4w7030_web.jpg

http://www.citygro.ws/projects/ace-hotel-los-angeles/posts/the-building-is-totally-gutted

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rx28g0aqfIk

http://www.socalofficerealestateblog.com/?p=2435

http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/4f8e0a9085216d65200c409b/Los-Angeles-Home-Staging-Best-Los-Angeles-Home-Stager-Los-Angeles-Home-Staging-to-Sell-Los-Angeles-Home-Staging-Model-Homes-Los-Angeles-Home-Staging-Lofts-Los-Angeles-Home-Staging-Adaptive-Reuse-Los-Angeles-Home-Staging-Modern-Homes_0165.jpg

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WATER CONSERVATION FAQ

March 15, 2014 on 5:11 pm | In Act Locally, all, Green Cities, Snapshot, Solutions, Trends, Uncategorized, Water | 4 Comments

edited by Jodi Summers

Did you know that about 40% of all drinking water in Los Angeles is used for landscape

irrigation? The City of Los Angeles Water Conservation Ordinance currently in effect helps city residents and businesses conserve precious drinking water.

By being savvy about our landscape water use, we can save a lot of water.

Currently the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power is asking us to honor Sprinkler Use Restrictions – Outdoor watering with sprinklers is restricted to three days a week with different watering days assigned to odd-numbered and even-numbered street addresses.

• Customers with odd-numbered street addresses – ending in 1, 3, 5, 7 or 9 – are allowed to use their sprinkler systems on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

• Customers with even-numbered street addresses – ending in 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8 – are allowed to use their sprinkler systems on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays.

• Watering with sprinklers is limited to one cycle of up to 8 minutes per station per watering day for nonconserving nozzle sprinkler systems (typical residential system), or two 15-minute cycles per watering day for conserving nozzle sprinkler systems.

• All outdoor watering is prohibited from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., regardless of the watering day.

* Street addresses ending in fractions are treated as whole numbers and observe the same day restrictions as others on their same side of the street (i.e.: 4321 ½ is regarded as 4321, an odd-numbered address.)

Watering by hand is allowed any day of the week, before 9:00 a.m. and after 4:00 p.m. The Water Conservation Ordinance requires that you use a self-closing water shutoff nozzle on your hose when watering outdoors.

Additional prohibited uses of water, which apply to all phases of the Ordinance and all LADWP customers, include:

• Watering of any hard surfaces such as sidewalks, walkways, driveways or parking areas unless flushing is needed to protect health and safety;

• Outdoor watering between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.;

• Outdoor watering during periods of rain;

• Allowing runoff onto streets and gutters from excessive watering;

• Allowing leaks from any pipe or fixture to go unrepaired;

• Washing vehicles without using a hose with a self-closing water shut-off nozzle;

• Serving water to customers in restaurants unless requested;

• Using water to clean, fill or maintain decorative fountains unless the water is part of a recirculating system;

• Installing single-pass cooling systems in new buildings;

• Installing non-recirculating systems in new car wash and commercial laundry systems; and

• Allowing large landscape areas to be watered without rain sensors that shut off irrigation systems.

The Ordinance also requires that hotel and motel operators provide guests with the option of not having towels and linens laundered daily.

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http://www.venicenc.org/ladwp-statement-regarding-statewide-drought-conditions/

http://www.lajollalight.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/2/files/2013/05/Athena-Tsai-poster1.jpg

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http://www.sandiego.gov/water/graphics/posters/poster10247.jpg

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www.ladwp.com/WaterConservation

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LADWP’S HEAD’S UP ON DROUGHT CONDITIONS

February 28, 2014 on 6:56 pm | In Act Locally, Green Cities, Snapshot, Solutions, Uncategorized, Water | 7 Comments

edited by Jodi Summers

Los Angeles has prepared for this drought. Today, Angelinos use less water per capita than residents of any major U.S. city with a population over 1 million. Los Angeles’ Mandatory Water Conservation Ordinance, which was strengthened in 2009, has resulted in unprecedented levels of water savings by  Los Angeles Department of Water and Power’s 680,000 water customers.

Already, LADWP customers have reduced their water use by 18%. The amount of water saved in Los Angeles—more than 141 billion gallons—is enough to serve the cities of Burbank, Santa Monica, Long Beach, Glendale, and Anaheim combined for two years.

Expecting drought conditions, LADWP and other Southern California water agencies have invested in storage over the past decade. Together with a strong conservation program, these investments will allow us to weather the current shortage. But we need to redouble our commitment to conservation and make sure all of us are fully complying with current water use restrictions and reducing our water use.

Last year 88% of the water used in Los Angeles was imported from external sources. Water supply shortages are a continuous threat across California and much of the West.

Now, residents across the city are being asked to look for more ways to reduce their water use and encourage our customers to take advantage of money saving rebates offered by LADWP to help them save both water and money. They include rebates for water efficient appliances and devices, and the “Cash for Grass” program, which has increased participation 10-fold since LADWP raised the rebate amount to $2 a square foot, up from $1.50, for customers who replace water-thirsty lawns with California Friendly landscape.

LADWP also will be expanding its public outreach and education efforts to raise awareness about the dry year conditions and users’ responsibility to use water wisely and in accordance with the City’s Water Conservation Ordinance.

More information on LADWP’s water conservation programs, regulations and rebate incentives can be found at www.ladwp.com/WaterConservation.

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http://www.venicenc.org/ladwp-statement-regarding-statewide-drought-conditions/

http://www.socalgreenrealestateblog.com/?p=3135

http://www.sandiego.gov/water/graphics/posters/poster10244.jpg

www.ladwp.com/WaterConservation

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LOS ANGELES KNOWS THE GREENEST BUILDING IS THE ONE ALREADY BUILT

February 13, 2014 on 11:02 am | In Act Locally, all, Green Building, Green Cities, Green Houses, Recycling, Snapshot, Solutions, Trends, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Edited by Jodi Summers

Bravo to the City of Los Angeles. Through innovative public policy and creative private development, L.A.is demonstrating how older buildings can be repurposed and repositioned for the new economy while reducing carbon emissions.

Believe it or not, Downtown Los Angeles contains one of the nation’s finest collections of early 20th century architecture. Most of these buildings sat vacant for decades, until a carefully targeted Adaptive Use Ordinance (ARO) removed regulatory barriers, provided incentives, and helped make it possible to repurpose more than 60 historic buildings over the past 14 years as new apartments, lofts, and hotels.

But many more buildings remain empty or underused in the downtown area and nearby commercial districts.

A recent report from the Urban Land Institute and the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Green Lab concludes that more than 10 million square feet of space in the city’s urban core is currently vacant. The report, Learning from Los Angeles, was presented to Mayor Eric Garcetti this morning, at an event organized by the ULI Los Angeles District Council. It describes strategies that build on the success of the ARO to unlock the economic and community development potential of underused older buildings. The report documents demolition, building, and vacancy trends throughout the city and recommends strategies for removing regulatory barriers, streamlining approvals, and providing incentives to make building reuse easier to accomplish.

Conversations organized by the Preservation Green and ULI Los Angeles identified key barriers to building reuse and recommend solutions to overcome these obstacles. The Los Angeles Conservancy, a key partner in this effort, served on the project Advisory Committee along with practitioners in real estate development, planning, design, construction, community revitalization, and local government.

Learning from Los Angeles is the first in a new series of research and policy reports being developed by the Preservation Green Lab through the Partnership for Building Reuse, a joint effort of the National Trust and ULI. Launched in Los Angeles in 2012, the Partnership for Building Reuse is designed to foster market-driven building reuse in major U.S. cities through dialogues with community stakeholders about building reuse challenges and opportunities.

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http://blog.preservationleadershipforum.org/2013/10/10/learning-from-los-angeles/#comments

http://www.socalofficerealestateblog.com/?p=2458

http://www.socalgreenrealestateblog.com/?p=3018

http://www.socalmultiunitrealestateblog.com/?p=2592

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